Advising for High School Students

Advisement is the key to a successful college experience. The availability of advisement services assists students with information on career opportunities, enrollment procedures, course transferability, and degree completion.

Barton students can expect student-centered advisement designed to increase student success by promoting continuous contact between the student, his/her advisor, and the Barton student support structure.

As a high school student taking college courses with Barton, you have access to our great student support and advisement resources.

Whether you're planning to attend Barton after graduation or take your dual or concurrent credit coursework with you when you transfer to a university, an advisor can help you stay on track. 

To be assigned to an advisor, complete the high school survey.  After completing the survey, you will be assigned to an advisor and contacted within three to seven days.  A Barton ID is required to complete the form, so make sure to have yours accessible when you begin!

Have a quick question or need some guidance? Schedule an appointment with an advisor! Available weekdays from 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., except observed holidays.

When contacting the Advisement Center, be sure to specify that you are a high school student taking college classes so our advisors can best assist you.

To access additional materials including the College Catalog, study guides for placement testing, and information for new advisees, visit the Advisement Center’s homepage!

Frequently Asked Questions

Click on one of the questions below to view the answer, or scroll down to view all questions and answers.

As a high school student, do I have an advisor?
What is a recommended course load for a high school student taking college classes?
I can take as many online classes as I want, right?  I can work on them whenever I want!
What happens if I do poorly in a college class?
If I failed my college class, can I opt not to transfer it to my next college?  How will anyone know?
How do I transfer credits to my next college?
What’s the difference between an unofficial transcript and an official transcript?
Can I drop a class during the semester?
What do I do if I have a serious or extended illness or family emergency that keeps me away from class?
Can my parent or guardian call and talk to you about college “stuff”?  It gets complicated fast, and I don’t want to miss anything!
What degree and certificate options does Barton have?
How do I become a Cougar today?

 

As a high school student, do I have an advisor?

As a high school student, you are considered “non-degree seeking” at Barton until you graduate high school.  Non-degree seeking students are not automatically assigned to an advisor but are encouraged to utilize advising and other student services.  If you have advising questions or intend to complete a degree or certificate with Barton, it is your responsibility to contact the Advisement Hotline to request an advisor assignment.  To make a request, please contact advisement@bartonccc.edu

Please be sure to identify yourself as a high school student including your high school name and anticipated graduation year so we can provide you with the most relevant information to your college and career goals.

What is a recommended course load for a high school student taking college classes?

There is no official limit on how many classes a high school student can or should take in conjunction with their high school curriculum, but please be realistic when choosing your course load.  You’re busy!  Carefully assess your time and commitments prior to enrolling in a college class or classes.  You must understand the time commitment associated with college classes and should expect to set aside two to three hours per credit hour, per week to study each subject.

I can take as many online classes as I want, right?  I can work on them whenever I want!

Online classes are a tricky subject.  Because of their flexible nature, they would appear to be easier than face-to-face classes.  It’s an illusion!  For face-to-face classes, you see your teacher in a classroom as many as five times per week, and he or she presents at least a portion of the content to you during that time.  With online classes, you are accountable for 100% of the material that you are required to learn—meaning the videos, readings, and all other activities are up to you to complete.  This requires time, energy, and commitment to signing in and completing your work.  Online classes have weekly deadlines, and it’s easy—if you fall behind—to avoid signing in.  This leads to getting even further behind and puts your grade in jeopardy.  Online learning isn’t for everyone, and that’s okay!

What happens if I do poorly in a college class?

Low or failing grades in college classes affect your overall GPA, which can affect your eligibility for federal financial aid, scholarships, and future college program acceptance.  In short, for the duration of their college career, students must maintain a 2.0 GPA and 67% completion rate of classes.  Enrolling in classes and later withdrawing or failing affects this percentage rate.  Each incoming freshman’s cumulative college GPA is evaluated at the start of his or her freshman year.  For the full Satisfactory Academic Progress policy, refer to the college catalog and student handbook.

If I failed my college class, can I opt not to transfer it to my next college?  How will anyone know?

Your college academic record begins the moment you enroll in a class, for dual credit or otherwise.  Regardless of whether or not you took the class in high school and whether you paid out of pocket, used the Boost Scholarship, or took advantage of Senate Bill 155, the class is a part of your college academic record and must be transferred to any future institution from which you seek a degree or certificate.  Thanks to technology, institutions are more globally linked now than ever before.  Although we can’t immediately see how you did at an institution, Financial Aid can access the fact that you’ve attended an institution whether or not you self-report it.  Be up-front with your advisor; he or she wants to help you be successful, whether that means retaking a class or pursuing another applicable class based on your strengths and weaknesses.

How do I transfer credits to my next college?

Transcript request information can be found on our website.  If you are ordering an official transcript, carefully choose whether you’d like the transcript sent now or after the semester ends.  If you are currently enrolled in classes and send a transcript immediately, the transcript will list the class you are currently taking as “In Progress” and will not list a grade.  The only way to have your current class list a grade on your transcript is to have the transcript sent at the conclusion of the class, after your instructor has officially posted grades.

What’s the difference between an unofficial transcript and an official transcript?

There are two types of transcripts that you can order from any higher education institution—unofficial and official—and you can save time and money by knowing the difference between the two.

Unofficial transcripts list the courses you’ve taken and the grades you’ve earned.  Unofficial transcripts are generally used for scholarship applications and meetings with advisors to explore the transfer of credits.  Scholarship applications should specifically list whether you need “official” or “unofficial” transcripts for application.  You will have this document in hand and be able to make copies of it for your records or for wherever you need to send it.

Official transcripts list the courses you’ve taken and the grades you’ve earned.  Official transcripts are generally used for more “official” purposes, like when you need to transfer your courses from Barton to another community college or university.  The “official” reason behind this type of transcript is to authorize the transfer institution to print the college credits you’ve earned with Barton Community College on the transcript of the college where you’re transferring. 

Since these credits go toward the final goal, the degree you’re earning, the document must be official and come directly from the Office of the Registrar.  You will not see this document at any point because it travels directly from institution to institution.

Can I drop a class during the semester?

You can—until a certain point in the semester.  The drop dates to exit the class and still receive a refund vary, dependent on when you enrolled in a class.  Contact the Coordinator of Community Education to learn this date.  It never hurts to double-check! 

The withdrawal date, the last date in the semester on which you can remove yourself from the class and still earn a W grade on your transcript, varies from semester to semester and can be confirmed by checking the Academic Calendars webpage.

You should never assume, under any circumstances, that you have automatically been dropped or withdrawn from a class.  Drops and withdrawals are manual processes.  Speak to your counselor and work with the Coordinator of Community Education to officially remove yourself from a class.

What do I do if I have a serious or extended illness or family emergency that keeps me away from class?

Always, always, always communicate with your instructor with as much advance warning as possible.  Extensions, deadlines, and any other form of exceptions come from your instructor and your instructor alone.  In extreme cases, an Incomplete grade (I) may be awarded by the instructor until the student completes the coursework as designated in the agreed-upon student-instructor contract.

Can my parent or guardian call and talk to you about college “stuff”?  It gets complicated fast, and I don’t want to miss anything!

College staff and faculty are not permitted to speak to anyone unless you, the student, give us permission.  Regardless of who paid for the class or your age, the academic records associated with your identity are confidential.  You may release your records (including giving permission for us to have phone and email conversations without you) to any person you wish by completing the Third Party Release form in your PAWS account.  Simply sign in, select the Student tab, and complete the Third Party Release.  Include as many or as few guardians to whom you’d like to grant access.

College can be confusing!  We are here to help.  If you would rather not complete the Third Party Release but want your parent’s help, sit down and call us together, draft an email to us and cc them on it, or make an appointment and visit campus together.  Please keep in mind that without that Third Party Release, we are not able to have conversations about your academic records with anyone but the student. 

For more information about the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act or 1974 (FERPA), visit the FERPA webpage.

What degree and certificate options does Barton have?

Visit our website and browse our Programs of Study.  You may use the buttons on the program-specific webpages to request information, visit campus, or apply to Barton.  Contact information for each program can be found on the program pages, or you may contact the Advisement Center via email at advisement@bartonccc.edu

Please be sure to identify yourself as a high school student including your high school name and anticipated graduation year so we can provide you with the most relevant information to your college and career goals.

How do I become a Cougar today?

Visit the Admissions webpage to view important announcements, upcoming events, and the Getting Started checklist. 

To contact our Admissions team and schedule a campus visit, call (620) 792-9286.

You can also print the High School Advising FAQ.